Complementary Practice

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Complementary Practice

Postby Monsoon » Mon Dec 31, 2012 5:25 pm

As a practitioner of Yang style tai ji I have had only a passing interest in other arts - with such a limited intellect as mine I must concentrate on one thing at a time!

This year I deconstructed my 108 Yang hand form and reconstructed it with the help of Dr Yang, Jwing-Ming and his excellent DVD into a more martially oriented shape. It was a fascinating process that has taught me a lot about myself and what I did and did not really understand. It is also, I believe, not a process that could be undertaken without a reasonably solid foundation to work from, so I wouldn't recommend new players try this.

Anyway, there is a local guy who, apparently, has 30+ years of nei gong/tai ji practice and who teaches Yang and Sun style, and this has got me thinking. Do many people train in two or more different styles/arts, and if so are certain arts considered a better fit together than others?

I also picked up Dr Yang's book on baguazhang, which is fascinating and tempting!

Over to you, my learned brethren!

Monsoon
peace and harmony

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Re: Complementary Practice

Postby Josh Young » Fri Jan 11, 2013 3:42 pm

I combine different martial art material using taijiquan principals and theory. But two of them are not Chinese martial arts.

Tradition says the internal arts are complimentary to one another and all appear to have daiost aspects.
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Re: Complementary Practice

Postby Greg Jah » Wed Jan 23, 2013 12:07 pm

Thank you for starting this interesting thread, Monsoon! This is an area of interest for me as well.

I am relatively new to Tai Chi & Qigong, but have a more solid foundation in the Filipino Martial Arts (Inosanto/ Lacoste blend & DBMA) which I continue to train.

Monday I met with an old Tai Chi friend and he showed me an intersting Qigong exercise which corresponds almost exactly with an arm lock we have in the FMA. I LOVE being able to do this qigong exercise because it is so complimentary to the combat application.

In case you are interested, the qigong exercise can be seen here, at minute 8:17 (it's the third qigong exercise): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zL4DyguWAk

Best,

Greg
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Re: Complementary Practice

Postby pete5770 » Mon Jan 28, 2013 10:39 pm

I used to try and practice Yang Long form and the Wu variation of Yang, since they are pretty much the same thing. With respect to the order of the movements.
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Re: Complementary Practice

Postby caesar » Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:14 pm

pete5770 wrote:I used to try and practice Yang Long form and the Wu variation of Yang, since they are pretty much the same thing. With respect to the order of the movements.


Are you talking about Wu style or a way to do Yang with a Wu flavor?
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Re: Complementary Practice

Postby pete5770 » Tue Jan 29, 2013 5:27 pm

caesar wrote:
pete5770 wrote:I used to try and practice Yang Long form and the Wu variation of Yang, since they are pretty much the same thing. With respect to the order of the movements.


Are you talking about Wu style or a way to do Yang with a Wu flavor?


I'm referring to the Wu style founded by Wu Ch'uan-yu, who was a student of Yang Lu-chan.
This style is considered a variation on Yang. Both long forms follow pretty much the same movements from beginning to end. However, Wu does differ from Yang in more than a few ways. A quick look at Yang and Wu long form videos and you should be able to see the "variations" and the similarities, so to speak. Note that I'm NOT referring to the Wu(hao) style, as it is generally considered to be a separate style(i.e. Yang, Wu(hao), and Chen being the three main styles. While Wu is an offshoot of Yang). I'm sure someone will dispute this but that's my take on it.
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