Northern Shaolin Sword

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Postby Zhao Zi Long » Sat Apr 30, 2005 2:33 pm

I have the book and I have finished San Cai Jian. I have one problem though. When I end the form am I supposed to be in the exact spot I started in or can I be five feet away from it?
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Postby scramasax57 » Sat Apr 30, 2005 7:41 pm

traditionally, forms end where they started, but it's really not a big deal. it depends on many variables like how far you jump, how big your steps are, etc.
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Postby Zhao Zi Long » Sun May 01, 2005 1:36 am

Thanks. Just because it's me, I like to stay with tradition. Another question. When I take the three steps backwards into the bow-arrow stances at the beginning of the form, do I put my foot out to the side and then go into the bow-arrow or do I put my feet straight back?
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Postby scramasax57 » Sun May 01, 2005 5:19 pm

i'm not entirely sure what part of the form you are talking about. could you be more specific?
aka eric hinds, 2nd stripe
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yang's martial arts association

changchuan, baihe, and xingyi
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Postby Zhao Zi Long » Sun May 01, 2005 6:24 pm

At the beginning of the form. Figures 3-13 to 3-14. Do I move my foot out sideways and then back in or do I go straight back. It's two steps not three like I thought.
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Postby DOM » Mon May 02, 2005 8:54 am

I have heard this before but have not found a good reason for ending in the same spot except for competitions,so to end up in front of the judges.To me it is complet nonsence and takes away from were you focuse should be, which is on the imaginary opponents that are trying to take your life,so your mind and spirit should be on defending your life not on were you should be standing when you finish.This is the true essence of forms,visualation and feeling of combat,if practiced this way they will a dramatic effect on your training and life.Your training will be deep and profound,and if the time ever comes you will be more prepaired for a real combat situation than those who do not do train this way.
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Postby Zhao Zi Long » Mon May 02, 2005 6:09 pm

Thank you. Stupid of me to ask that anyway.
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Postby DOM » Tue May 03, 2005 10:04 am

It was not stupid to ask,many peaple feel verry strongley about ending in the exact spot you started.I have seen some feel so strongly about it that there was no substance or realism to their forms.I do not completly dissmiss that their is a good reason to do so,but I have not heard of one that makes it something to consider.If any one feel they have a good reason to do this let us know.
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Postby Walter Wong » Tue May 03, 2005 11:05 am

Same here. I am very traditional and yet I don't often stress ending up in the exact same spot I started my form in. I find often times I don't end up exactly in the same spot I start my forms for the past 9 years I trained forms at YMAA. Sometimes I maybe 1 foot away or 4 feet away from where I started but I never found myself in the same spot. If you end up finishing in the same spot you started, then that's nice. But I wouldn't make the starting/ending same spot that heavy of a focus. Concentrate on making your forms alive and combat effective. It's more important that you hit your opponent accurately than accurately finishing in the same spot you started fighting from.

On a side note, the Jian or straight sword is the most complicated weapons I have ever worked with. I am in a 2nd session of a sword workshop with Master Yang and from what I've seen of the books and videos of YMAA's Shaolin sword, although great book/video, the subtleties can't be felt or seen from books and videos alone. It's those subtleties that'll mean life and death when concerned with actual usage against another sword. Subtleties that you can only get from direct instruction from Master Yang or other qualified instructor. Currently I haven't learned any of the sword forms from this workshop, just the practical applications with lots of partner work which will be easily fused with the forms. The book/video is great reference for sure after you've recieved live instruction, but you can only do so much with the book/video alone learning from scratch. Do what you can with the book/video, and definitely try to attend a sword seminar or workshop with Master Yang.
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Postby Zhao Zi Long » Tue May 03, 2005 6:29 pm

I am training as hard as I can for now. It will be a while before I can find a certified instructor. Thanks for all of your help.
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Postby DOM » Wed May 04, 2005 10:23 am

Walter do you know if the Tai Chi sword SEMINAR this summer will be any thing like what you are doing in the work shop.I would love to attend but I am unsure because I was preaty dissapointed with the last Taichi Dao semminar.Dr.Yang was not teaching.Do you know if he will be teaching the next sword seminar.
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Postby Walter Wong » Wed May 04, 2005 12:57 pm

I think there might be a sword seminar this summer. I'll have to take a look at the summer seminars brochure later when I get to the school. I'm not sure what any of his Dao or sword seminars are like. I rarely take seminars at the school. I only took the Chi Gong level 1 seminar so far awhile back.

As for the sword workshop he's holding, it's every Monday night for like a 14 or 16 week session. This session just started up a couple Mondays ago. He'll likely have another sword session when this one is complete. This sword workshop hardly deals with any forms. It's mostly focused on solo and partner drills (mainly alot of partner drills) for direct no nonsense practical applications of the straight sword. The drills are just these patterns that can flow from one to another to the point when you have the coordination down and reaction, it pretty much evolves into a free sparring with the wooden swords. It's also so complexed and difficult that I'm not sure at this moment if White Crane or sword is more difficult. My White Crane pretty much sux as it is so I'm just White Crane and sword inept. So at my skill with the sword now, I'm not ready for free sparring with the sword yet. I'm still trying to get the basics down.

I wish you could attend this workshop. It's great.
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Postby Zhao Zi Long » Wed May 04, 2005 4:41 pm

Surprise! I have yet another question.

Figure 3-65 W shows a kick used to block Black's sword. What kind of kick is this? Is it a crescent kick?
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Postby Zhao Zi Long » Mon May 09, 2005 7:07 pm

Can someone answer please? :)
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