Time required to learn forms

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Time required to learn forms

Postby pilotfish » Tue Jun 03, 2014 3:12 pm

Hi.

Since I train alone from DVDs, I don't have classes to determine how long it can take to learn forms. I can take my time, but I'd rather not be too lenient, and I'm looking for general perspective.

Certainly each form itself and each student are unique factors, so can anyone give me a very rough idea...so that I don't end up finishing with my fourth one at age 90?

Thanks
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Re: Time required to learn forms

Postby joeblast » Tue Jun 03, 2014 4:28 pm

Not sure what forms you are doing - but no matter what it is you are doing, make it also an exercise in awareness, and the mindful attention to various mechanisms will more thoroughly ingrain the habit energy the practice imparts. :)
Even in mildly complex systems, any outcome is the wrong thing to target, with the process being where the focus should be.
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Re: Time required to learn forms

Postby pilotfish » Tue Jun 03, 2014 6:20 pm

I'm almost done with Gong Li, the second in the Basic Sequences. After that I'll start the Intermediate Sequences.

I learn them in sections, sometimes subsections of those outlined, following the demonstrations as closely as I can. After practicing a "basic-idea" version a while from memory, I go back to the videos to see what I missed, forgot, or otherwise am doing that doesn't match.

Winter flu and colds can interrupt progress, as did moving. But I'm looking for perspective -- a range? -- to pick up the pace a little.
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Re: Time required to learn forms

Postby John the Monkey mind » Sat Jun 07, 2014 12:27 pm

I would redouble on the forms you already know before moving on. Once you think you are doing them right do the basic ones another 500 each. Video yourself every 50 or so and then compare it to the form on the DVD. It would be even better if you could get someone who knows the forms from instruction to give you a few pointers even if they are not an instructor themselves. Even 10 min of their time will make a huge difference to your training.

It is quicker in the long run to get things really right before moving on. I am learning/have learned the first basic form now and getting into their applications and they are fantastic (I have been attending classes for a number of years in YMAA Yang 108 Taiji but I now also occasionally have access to instruction in YMAA Shaolin) I am not really in a huge hurry to move on as the basic Long Fist has a lot to teach. The Karate practitioners traditionally spent up to five years on one kata and I don't think long fist is any less deep and in Kung Fu the most basic forms are often the most significant to a style as they form the basis of future power and core principles.
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