Broken toe

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Broken toe

Postby scramasax57 » Wed Jan 17, 2007 9:15 pm

Landed myself a broken toe (the big one), my question is how imperative is it to splint this? I set it myself (it was really only a little off, relatively small fracture) and taped it up to the next toe for support, obviously I'm taking it pretty easy on it but I live in the city so there's lots of walking in my life. It doesn't really hurt that bad, occasional twinges if I've been walking for a while, but will not splinting it slow healing? I don't really have any money to buy a splint with, but I could come up with it if it'll make a big difference in healing time.

Oh and by the way I haven't put jow on it because it is also cut up, but I am icing it occasionally.
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Postby Tarandus » Fri Jan 19, 2007 8:02 pm

S: please see my previous posting on fractured ankle. Well, allright, mine was an avulsion fracture, i.e. the ligaments in my ankle were so severely twisted that the glue that binds the ligaments to the bone gave way, taking a flake of bone with it. Whereas by the sound of it, yours is a simple fracture, end of story. Nevertheless, I am sure from Dr. Yang's many books, you will be able to direct your Chi to the affected area and bring about a speedy recovery, as I did in my own case (and please believe me on that : I am really not joking, I don't play games and it really did happen, and it still astounds me to this day). As far as ice is concerned, I don't know. When I had my avulsion fracture, they just discharged me from hospital on crutches (I couldn't walk) and gave me a tubigrip (i.e. an elastic bandage to contain the swelling, which was really serious). They didn't even give me any analgesics. When I finally got home, I found the tubigrip so uncomfortable, I just ripped it off and threw it into the rubbish bin. I didn't have any aspirin in my flat, and I couldn't be bothered struggling the half mile or so on crutches to the chemist to get any analgesics. And that's when I thought of using the meditation I had already learned, but this time for curative purposes. Well, to revert to the subject of ice. I firmly believe that the body reacts to injuries with swelling in order to give a NATURAL protection in the form of a cushion to the affected area. Interfering with this natural process in the form of ice, tubigrips, etc., probably does more harm than good. But of course, that's a personal opinion only. Anyway, I hope you recover soon. By the way, how did you break your toe? Was it during martial arts practice, or just in the normal course of life? Kind regards, T.
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Postby scramasax57 » Sat Jan 20, 2007 1:57 pm

I was wrestling with one of my housemates, who despite not having any martial arts training is a very large very strong guy, and when I managed to take him down my bare foot kicked a cabinet really hard. At first I thought it was just sore, but I quickly realized it was broken. As for the ice, I always make sure not to leave it on for too long; the procedure that was always recommended to me was ice for twenty minutes, massage for twenty minutes, keep alternating for an hour or so. Of course massage has to be pretty gentle when there is a fracture, but it definitely helps because of increased blood and qi circulation.
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Postby Tarandus » Sat Jan 20, 2007 3:08 pm

Ouch! Actually, thinking about tangling with people who don't know martial arts, sometimes I think they can be quite dangerous because they are unpredictable - they don't fight logically. I remember attending fencing classes a while back to revise what I had learned as a boy at school. This fat old man, aged about 60 I would say, and with no previous experience of fencing at all, enrolled in the classes one day and was immediately able to defeat even some very experienced students in the class, through a combination of naturally fast reactions, but of course no technique whatsoever! Kind regards, T.
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Postby scramasax57 » Sat Jan 20, 2007 6:07 pm

Yes, untrained people can be extremely unpredictable. One of the things that trips me up most often is I'll use a technique. my body will realize that I've left an opening and automatically move to defend it, only to find that the opponent had no idea the opening was there and so made no attack there. It can get you caught up in second-guessing yourself, and is a very good lesson in not overthinking. You just have to fight more conservatively, and not use the usual tricks and feints that you would (false openings, etc) against a more experienced opponent, instead sticking to the very basics and using your superior conditioning, body structure, timing, reactions, and strategy instead of superior techniques. But anyways the toe is healing well.
aka eric hinds, 2nd stripe
n. andover, ma branch
yang's martial arts association

changchuan, baihe, and xingyi
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Postby Tarandus » Sun Jan 21, 2007 5:16 pm

Eric: yes, this is good advice for dealing with muggers, etc. Changing topic, I notice that you do Hsing-I (sorry, I can't remember how you spelled it), as well as external martial arts. But what is your opinion of the hard/soft styles such as Mizong? I know nothing about these whatsoever. They are said to be very effective. Kind regards, T.
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Postby white dragon » Sat Jun 16, 2007 5:19 pm

I broke my toe about two years ago while sparring and two other people at the club have aswell...must be one of the most common kung fu injurys...quite a strange one too don't you think!
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