The relative merits of sparring vs other methods to combat

Discuss sparring, training applications in a competition environment, or even in real-life (fighting, self-defence). Please no violence!
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The relative merits of sparring vs other methods to combat

Postby John the Monkey mind » Mon Feb 22, 2010 5:07 am

In Wing Chun it is reasonably common for students not to do free sparing and I have read in places that sparing may actually be counter productive in some ways as it gives you an unreal idea of combat.


How do you think sparring compares to realistic drilling?

:)
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Postby yat_chum » Mon Feb 22, 2010 3:38 pm

You have surprised me, which Wing Chun associations have you had dealings with?
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Postby yat_chum » Mon Feb 22, 2010 7:18 pm

Thinking about it, many Wing Chun groups place too much emphasis on Chi Sau in my opinion.

What is realistic drilling? Can a drill be realistic?

Sparring isn't fighting but it is a good learning experience especially sparring with other styles. I can't see how martial arts can be learnt without sparring.
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Postby yat_chum » Mon Feb 22, 2010 7:20 pm

yijing zhidong

use stillness to overcome movement
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Postby John the Monkey mind » Tue Feb 23, 2010 3:59 am

The Wing Chun group not sparing was one from Sifu Shaun Rawcliffe's organisation West Midlands Wing Chun. I have also trained for a few months with a guy called Alan Gibson, his group spare. Seniors in both groups could defend them self so clearly sparing is not the only way lol.

:)
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Re:

Postby pete5770 » Thu Feb 23, 2012 5:48 pm

yat_chum wrote:
Sparring isn't fighting but it is a good learning experience especially sparring with other styles. I can't see how martial arts can be learnt without sparring.


If you wanted to be a great pool player you would have to shoot a lot of pool. Whether it's just practicing at the table or all out competition it all adds up to becoming the whole player.
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Re: The relative merits of sparring vs other methods to comb

Postby Josh Young » Fri Mar 23, 2012 1:54 pm

A lot of people wisely point out, through decades of training and instruction experience, that sparring has the potential to build habits that are bad in terms of self defense in a combat situation.

Usually when these people criticize sparring they address a specific style or practice and the flaws in terms of the habits involved, rather than just make a blanket condemnation of sparring without being specific.

I've seen it go either way, people who do sporting sparring in tournaments based on point systems often gear their training and methods for getting points and this is not always conducive to good self defense practices. This was related to me by several black belt friends of mine who have done well in tournaments of that type. I trust their observations and that of their teachers on this matter.
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Re: The relative merits of sparring vs other methods to comb

Postby Amaranth » Sat Jun 02, 2012 2:14 am

Sparring builds good instinctual reaction, but depending on the art being trained, may lead to reactions against its foundational principles. It is the responsibility of the teacher to point out when the student is building bad habits during their sparring sessions.
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