Sequence applications in sparring

Discuss sparring, training applications in a competition environment, or even in real-life (fighting, self-defence). Please no violence!
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Sequence applications in sparring

Postby silverfox » Sun Jul 19, 2009 8:13 pm

Hi Guys,

What applications from what sequences do you like to use in sparring and why?


Thanks,

Scott
"The greatest goal of life is to cultivate your own human nature
and learn how to harmonize with nature and others around you"

GLMC

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www.ymaakungfu.com
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Sparring Applications used and explainations

Postby oldstudent » Sun Jul 19, 2009 11:14 pm

Hello Scott, I have only passed the first 4 sparring levels so I am not proficient in leg techniques. Because of this I will concentrate on arm / hand attack and defend techniques involving the upper body.
White Crane defense techniques:
Application: Cover & Repel: (both low and high blocks), Mother and Son,
Sequence: White crane fighting form, first level 2 person sequence.
Explaination: Training at short distance fighting, white crane techniques are emphasized more. Short distance sparring builds up reaction, speed, arm conditioning but you must also focus on "triangle body" and sticking hands to improve your skill.

Long Fist Techniques:
Pull out your 'Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu book', go to page 49.
figure 85, high cover block. note the triangle body.
figure 89, low repel block and clear for upper cut stike.
figure 92, mother and son
page 50, figure 93, high repel : note triangle body. blocking arm angle but most importantly the position of master yang's left hand which is getting ready to push the opponents punching fist out so that master yang'sright hand can strike (see page 170 figure 20a).
page 51, figure 104 is very important! you must master this block as the blocking arm will quickly strike to the ribs with (gung sou, double finger fist), see figure 64 page 45 (however when you strike your hand will be upside down. Your arm will then immediately strike the opponents temple with a back fist. (see page 109 figure 110a and page 154 figure 271a / 272a

My point is this. If you go back and revisit one of Master Yang's first books: Shaolin Long Fist Kung FU, If you pay very close attention to master yang's techniques IN DETAIL you will grow imensely, especially if someone points out what he is doing in the picture. you will gain an understanding which will open your mind by researching what he has done. The pictures in that book show his mastery of the techniques.

Sometimes one should go backwards to move forward....Old Student....
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Postby Josh Young » Mon Jul 20, 2009 10:24 am

I like to use the grasp sparrows tail sequence in sparring.
Sometimes for fun my push hands training gets into decent blows and striking, the combination of the moves in grasp sparrows tail is highly effective in my experience.
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Postby silverfox » Mon Jul 20, 2009 10:21 pm

Old Student,

Thanks for you well thought out explanation. I like the Longfist book alot. I think it is still today one of Master Yangs best books along with the White Crane book.

I totally agree with moving back to move forward. I believe it is important to slow down in order to check the quality of what one has learned. I am a big fan of going back over the beginner levels 1 through 4 and really training them over and over to try to reach a deeper level.

I find that teaching the applications before or with the sequence helps the students visualize alot better and have better sense of enemy.

I once was concerned with learning alot and moving forward through the levels quickly, but these days I am more concerned with really examining what I already have and truly making it second nature in the four areas of CMA when applicable. I really want to make sure that the art Master passed on is properly preserved and I humbly pass it on to my students with excellent quality.

I am trying to cultivate the root of YMAA Amesbury for the future of YMAA and to honor Master Yang for the great gift he gave me. I still have alot of work to do, but it is a labor of love and watching my students grow truly makes me happy. I am honored to be a part of YMAA.

I like many of the moves from Lien Bu Quan up to the first sting, three rings around the moon from GLQ, and I think that Xiao Hu Yan has some of the most vicious techniques I have seen......so far :D

Shi Zhi Tang has some nice Shaolin Boxing combos as well, press down and uppercut 2 times, block the ribs and end with a fierce hook punch.

I can think of many more, but I like these to start. Master always said to find some techniques that suit you and master them for sparring. Everybody is different and that is the beauty of YMAA. We all learn the same material more or less, but still have great individual creativity in terms of application and preferences.

I appreciate your comments, please keep em coming. :D
"The greatest goal of life is to cultivate your own human nature
and learn how to harmonize with nature and others around you"

GLMC

Scott Tarbell
Director of YMAA Amesbury
www.ymaakungfu.com
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Postby silverfox » Mon Jul 20, 2009 10:31 pm

Hi Josh,

I agree with you on Grasp Sparrows Tail. I think that is a powerful technique with many applications. I like using it for Shuai Jiao.

In the Taiji sequence I am a big fan of embrace the tiger and return to the mountain = double leg take down. Master Yang did this to me a few years ago and being a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu guy I was really excited to see that application. Master Yang has a better double leg takedown than most grapplers I have seen, very fast and unavoidable, no sprawl would defend his takedown. :twisted:

Master Yang truly is the example of how to use Taiji for the four areas of CMA. His Taiji for Shuai Jiao is a great DVD! :D

Thanks for your comments and keep em coming :D
"The greatest goal of life is to cultivate your own human nature
and learn how to harmonize with nature and others around you"

GLMC

Scott Tarbell
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www.ymaakungfu.com
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Postby jchang » Mon Jun 28, 2010 3:18 pm

i find myself mostly using the jing patterns in qi xing over and over. although, there are some other ones thrown in, i guess i prefer these the most :P
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Postby silverfox » Thu Jul 01, 2010 7:37 am

Qi Xing does have alot of nice applications for in close fighting. What are the targets for those jing strikes? I would think neck, chin, and solar plexus. What Long Fist Applications do you like?
"The greatest goal of life is to cultivate your own human nature
and learn how to harmonize with nature and others around you"

GLMC

Scott Tarbell
Director of YMAA Amesbury
www.ymaakungfu.com
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Postby jchang » Thu Jul 01, 2010 12:44 pm

um.. everywhere :P and.. longfist? i like the part in xiao hu yan with the punch, seal down, backhand, clear, and strike from under. also, in yi lu mai fu, the end with the clear and backfist :)
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