Combat training questions?...

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Combat training questions?...

Postby lilman » Wed Feb 13, 2008 12:19 pm

I actually got a couple questions about actual fighting to help myself better understand if I am to someday become a Taiji instructor.

In my lifetime I've seen a lot of fights and met a lot of streetfighters. One thing I commonly hear is a fighter blacking out in a fight and just throwing down. Some people I tried to teach still has that issue. Is this a self control issue or is it something else that I could not teach them to overcome? Is it a result of anger? Or is it they dont want to deal with the stress of the fight?

My next question is I also met a lot of people, mostly female, that when an attack was made on them, the blacked out for a second and wasnt able to react immediately. Then know the techniques, and can do them, is not afraid, and will see the punch coming, but the body will not react with the sight. I suggested things to build hand eye coordinaion, ie drawing and games like tetris, but to no avail. Would concentration training help to improve this? Is it just mental? What kind of training could I offer?

Also just for my info, I practice Taiji, and I practice a lot with a boxer that is faster and stronger than me and likes to do quick jabs and pull punches. Even though he is faster, with my Taiji training he cannot hit me, and I can get in good punches, kicks, and cavity strikes, but It is extremely difficult to use and chin na or shuai jiao techniques. Any suggestions to improve my training so I can utilize those aspects of my art against faster fighters? The stronger part is not an issue.
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Postby Yue » Tue Feb 19, 2008 4:25 pm

Question 1: I think that the blacking out and loss of self control has to do with very intense adrenaline rushes. One of my sparring partners needs to always be very careful and keep telling himself to hold back during sparring, otherwise if he gets hit hard enough he will lose control and keep fighting until he is struck hard enough to immobilize him (that's never happened when we spar though, thankfully). I'm not sure how you can teach someone to learn to control adrenaline.
Question 2: I'm guessing that the immobilization at the start of a fight has to do with a concious (or more likely subconcious) fear of being struck. Have them spar A LOT and they should be able to overcome this.
Question 3: From my very limited understanding of using Chin Na in a fight, I can tell you that you will have to be extremely fast and keep him away from you. If you ask me, I would just forget the use of grappling against a stronger and faster opponent. That is asking for trouble.
Anything goes.
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Postby lilman » Wed Feb 20, 2008 12:14 am

:-) Thank you so much for the information. I asked my teacher the last question. He showed me deflect and step forward with the applications. I tried it on the faster opponent and got hit... When I just stick, or just adhere to his movements I found I can easily see when he makes a mistake and capitolize on his errors. Hes fast, but he uses no techniques. Those other 2 answers I will have to remember and incorporate them in my training agenda so when I am ready to teach Ill be prepared. Thank you.
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Postby Yue » Thu Feb 21, 2008 9:06 pm

No prob! Regarding the first question, I googled controlling adrenaline rushes and found this: http://www.fightingarts.com/ubbthreads/ ... n=0&page=0. The fourth post is the most informative, IMHO.
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Postby lilman » Fri Feb 22, 2008 10:21 am

:-) Thank you, that was helpfull and very informational. :-)
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IlIman

Postby jfraser » Sun Mar 02, 2008 9:32 am

Check out the comments and essays of Doc Stier on the Tai Chi section of his forum, www.shenmentao.com.

:)
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Before qinna...

Postby jfraser » Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:06 am

My philosphy is hit him hard and hurt him before you attempt any qinna.
Momentalily, that removes his resistance. Otherwise, he will not cooperate with your qinnq moves, and you may get really hurt. :oops: :)
Last edited by jfraser on Wed Apr 02, 2008 1:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby lilman » Tue Apr 01, 2008 12:29 pm

:-) Thank you again Jfrasier. My only concern with that is I am talking about sparring with a friend. Im sure its frowned upon to use Short Jing to strike the solar plexus then break your buddies arms. :oops: :twisted: But if it was a real fight, and I was worried I could not subdue the opponent without using force, and they had serious intent to kill me, I would be the first one to take them out quick by any means necessary, and get out of the situation.
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Postby clairvoyager » Wed Apr 02, 2008 9:56 am

About qinna, some people say it is very difficult to apply in real combat. You must adapt your technique to your opponent. So if you are tackling a bigger opponent, it wouldn't be much use to use a shoulder joint-lock. You'd better go with the fingers or wrists qinna. Take one technique and practice over and over, until you can pull it in a real fight.

However, you say he is faster. Then, I don't understand how can you get him and not get hit. Remember the classic, "if the opponent doesn't move, then I don't move, if he moves, then I move first". This means that you must have the timing to be on time for the technique, in another words, you need to be faster.

Regarding the adrenaline, black-out, etc, I highly recommend Bruce Frantzis book, "The power of internal martial arts and chi". In the first chapter, he addresses the different ways you can approach a fight. The point is that you cannot effectively use an internal martial art if you loose your mind in a fight. How are you supposed to control your qi and your opponent if you just either black out or go berserk? There are ways to overcome those impulses and Bruce Frantzis talks about that in his book.
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Postby lilman » Wed Apr 02, 2008 11:12 am

Thank you Clairvoyager. I will definately check out that book. But on the qin na I did happen to grasp the secret when fighting a faster opponent.

Remember the classic by Master Wong Chnug Yua also state:

"There are thousands of methods and techniques in the martial arts. Regardless of the techniques and postures employed, most depend on physical condition ie. strong beats weak, and speed ie. fast defeats slow, so that the weak must fall to the strong and the slow must lose to the fast. this, however, is dependent on physical ability and does not relate to the discipline that we now discuss."

Master Wong was actually talking about listening Jing. If you know what your opponent is going to do, it all depends on the techniques you choose. I was going with an impractical qinna technique for the situation. My opponent was pulling punches so I should've went for a faster qinna technique than what I was using. basically I was trying to use a technique to win instead of letting the technique use me to win.
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