adrenline rush and application of technique?

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adrenline rush and application of technique?

Postby jfraser » Thu Nov 09, 2006 6:34 am

I have seen films of Wing Tsun and Choi Lay Fut fighters fighting on a roof top in Hong Kong, and it seems as if when the [b]adreniline rushes [/b]into their nervous systems, all the kung fu training evaporates. These are people that have trained in each of these systems for many years.

Then we have a roof top brawl, with nothing resembling years of either systems training showing itself in the fighters Just flying roundhouse punches and a tackle. All the lap sou, pak sou , etc, fell apart in these circustances.

What about he adreniline factor with inticate techniques that require small motor coordiniation, like in Chin Na or pressure point stiking? My understanding is the small motor coordination all but disappears, and there are only gross movements availble with this adreniline rush.
Perhaps, that is part of the reason some Kung Fu masters pick a favorite technique and do it 200 time a day the rest of their life.

What do you think and what is your experience?

James :?: :)
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Postby Hermes » Sun Nov 04, 2007 11:51 pm

I've worried about this too. When you get that adreneline dump your arms turn into two twizzler sticks and your fine motor skills go. The military trains for this. That is why real fights look less like Chuck Norris and more like Jerry Springer. Boxing and wrestling fare okay, but I would forget the wristy-twisty stuff.
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Postby Yue » Wed Dec 05, 2007 9:47 pm

I don't have much experience with that sort of thing. I tend to be able to focus during an adrenaline rush. I've applied strikes to areas like the eyes and solar plexus easily enough during an adrenaline rush.
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Re: adrenline rush and application of technique?

Postby Dave C. » Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:57 pm

jfraser wrote:I have seen films of Wing Tsun and Choi Lay Fut fighters fighting on a roof top in Hong Kong, and it seems as if when the adreniline rushes into their nervous systems, all the kung fu training evaporates. These are people that have trained in each of these systems for many years.

Then we have a roof top brawl, with nothing resembling years of either systems training showing itself in the fighters Just flying roundhouse punches and a tackle. All the lap sou, pak sou , etc, fell apart in these circustances.

What about he adreniline factor with inticate techniques that require small motor coordiniation, like in Chin Na or pressure point stiking? My understanding is the small motor coordination all but disappears, and there are only gross movements availble with this adreniline rush.
Perhaps, that is part of the reason some Kung Fu masters pick a favorite technique and do it 200 time a day the rest of their life.

What do you think and what is your experience?

James :?: :)


One of the most important differences between the external and internal systems is the regulation of the nervous system. The internal styles have lots of meditation and neigong methods for achieving highly relaxed states. One of the main uses of that training is that it teaches you to regulate your nervous system when you're fighting. This will happen if you're taught to put the neigong back into the movements and sparring instead of just practicing it as a separate type of training. Few are taught this IMO.

Naturally another factor is experience. The more experience someone has, the more relaxed they will be. So even good external arts guys will have a higher level of relaxation. Look at Frank Shamrock when he fights. He's so calm and cool.

Many of those Hong Kong fights were by lower-ranked students. This is an old way of solving grievances without too much loss of face. You let the younger, less-experienced, hot-headed students fight it out with your rival. If they win, great. If they lose, you can blame the low-level of the students. No real loss of face to the "masters" who's schools are involved. This is common in Asia.
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