18 Lohan hands

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18 Lohan hands

Postby Formless » Wed Apr 16, 2008 7:34 am

18 Lohan hands has been acknowledged, by some Qigong masters, as one of Damo’s qigong classics with origins in the Shaolin Temple.
I don’t know any reference made to 18 Lohan hands by Master Yang Jwing-Ming.
Can anyone tell me why is that so or share some knowledge on 18 Lohan hands?
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Re: 18 Lohan hands

Postby adrenalexpire » Tue Apr 29, 2014 7:30 pm

I realise this thread is a very old thread but I am also interested in this topic if anyone has any information on it.
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Re: 18 Lohan hands

Postby Dvivid » Wed Apr 30, 2014 9:06 am

Master Yang didn't train the 18 Luohan with his teacher. He doesn't teach anything that he didn't "master" by traditional standards. Still, he has researched and trained them himself.

According to Master Yang, the 18 Luohan is the same as the Muscle/Tendon Changing qigong. The theory is the same, the movements evolved over time.

I have also looked into it. Here's an excerpt from an article Im working on:
Both Bodhidharma and the Buddha arose from the Indian warrior class, known as the Kshatriya caste. Their martial arts were called Vajramukti, a name meaning "Thunderbolt clasped hands". Based mainly on barehanded combat, Vajramukti was practiced in peacetime as physical training for health. The postures or forms were known as "pratima" and were linked together into sequences, known as "nata", which were meant to train both the mind and body. The most important of these sequences was the 18 Subduings (Astadasajacan) which reflect the Buddhist doctrine of the 18 perfections, or paramitas. In China, this sequence became known as the 18 Arhats or 18 Lohan, which means "perfected person", and refers to enlightened disciples of the Buddha. Bodhidharma translated and taught this Mahāyāna Buddhist yoga, documented in his Muscle/Tendon Changing Classic, or Yi Jin jing. Bodhidharma also translated and taught Buddhist therapeutic kriya yoga (Asthimajja Parisuddhi) for "Bone marrow cleansing and purification", known as Xi Sui Jing in Chinese.
"Avoid Prejudice, Be Objective in Your Judgement, Be Scientific, Be Logical and Make Sense, Do Not Ignore Prior Experience." - Dr. Yang

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Re: 18 Lohan hands

Postby tkc » Tue Oct 14, 2014 4:54 pm

I learnt this form back in 1989/1990 from Chen Yong Fa at the Choy Lee Fut Foundation in Sydney Australia. I wish I could say I've been practising it diligently every day since then, but sadly that isn't the truth. I did resurrect it about a year ago though and have been fairly consistent with it since then.

As it was explained to me at the time, it's a qigong form that comes from the original yoga exercises Damo brought from India to China. At the time I didn't think to ask anymore about it. I was 19 and getting very bored with the standing pole qigong my own teacher had been making me do so I was happy to be given a chance to move a little bit!

I don't ever recall mention of the Shaolin Temple, but I was guest at the Sydney school so my exposure to Chen Yong Fa was quite limited.
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