striking surface for ji

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striking surface for ji

Postby pilotfish » Mon Mar 19, 2018 6:16 pm

Hi.

I'm working through the 37 postures dvd. I like the depth that shows the flexibility/variety of uses available for each move.

In the peng lu ji an sequence, Dr Yang explains that ji can be used with the leading fist as a phoenix eye to break the lower rib and/or strike the liver. But position for the hand is different from the position that he recommends for the sequence itself.

For the normal sequence, he says to put the heels of the hands against each other and wrap the fingers around the hands. He demonstrates how quick and violent the move is in a live situation.

Assume you're doing it to the right, with the right hand supported by the left, which pushes from the rear. BTW, which one is yin and which is yang? I don't want to guess.

For that position, what is the striking surface? It might vary in combat, but what's the ideal? Do you try to strike with the back of the right hand? The forearm (ulna and/or radius)?
pilotfish
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Re: striking surface for ji

Postby pilotfish » Sat Apr 28, 2018 1:22 pm

I'd like to hear from someone with more experience, but here's how I'm thinking of it as I practice. I'm trying to imagine how it would work in a live situation.

In these comments, the right arm is forward and horizontal, and hands are clasped so that the left is behind the right hand pushing it forward. The alternative striking surfaces are (1) the index finger knuckle (phoenix eye fist as in the 37 Postures dvd), (2) the back of the right hand, and (3) somewhere along the right forearm, anywhere from the wrist to the elbow.
  • Striking with the knuckle is explained in the dvd.
  • It seems to me that striking with the metacarpal bones/back of the right hand risks breaking them. This is mitigated by compressing the flesh of both palms as the trailing left hand pushes forward.
  • Striking with the wrist risks those bones.
  • Striking with the forearm risks those bones, since they're long and in the middle between the support points of the left hand and the right upper arm, both pushing foreward.
  • Striking near/at the right elbow provides the power of the right arm, shoulder, back, etc.
Does that make sense?
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Re: striking surface for ji

Postby Mach » Tue May 15, 2018 5:04 pm

Hiya pilotfish
Later in that dvd I think he shows it again. When I practice that my right hand has the index finger joint like a point wrist bent so i can hit with the point. My left hand is on the base of the right hand thumb/wrist. Your really not striking with just your hands or arms but starting at you left foot and leg storing jing and it kinda flows from there through your waste upper body and them out the very small point of your "phoenix eye". Your focusing all the energy into that small point. The object as I understand it isn't breaking ribs but shocking the nerves between the ribs. Imagine trying to breath with a very sharp pain there. Be careful practicing that though. Dr. Yang is a Master, that sequence impressed me also. He knows how to control his jing you can hurt yourself (joints) if you can't "pull" the power like pulling a punch. BTW I'm a five year beginner so take this in mind.
Pratice!!!! :)
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Re: striking surface for ji

Postby pilotfish » Wed May 16, 2018 11:55 am

Thanks, Mach. I like your detail. It's also one of the things I like about Dr Yang. I'll keep working through the dvd.
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